Our consulting intersects culture and learning with wisdom to develop the conditions for conscious leadership that evolve conversations.

We view organizations as a network of agreements and commitments. Our view locates “conversation” as the primary structure for authoring change and deepening learning to include all voices.

As consultants, we develop new “conversational structures” for learning and accountability that systematically dissolve the barriers and obstacles to authentic conversations.

Our work involves generative communications, contemplative learning, team learning, and systems thinking to cultivate conscious leadership that includes all voices and shared commitments.

What does it mean to lead organizational cultures dealing with volatile change and complexity?

Leadership today must course throughout organizations and networks to increase a leadership consciousness for developing shared commitments and accountability.

Conscious leadership demands self-awareness and contextual awareness to navigate the cultural and technological changes that involve learning and unlearning.

Our work deepens personal mastery to be with uncertainty and ambiguity while developing continual learning as a practice, and lifelong discipline.

What does it mean to communicate in a way that shapes perceptions, frames situations, and coordinates action?

How can communication create the mutual satisfaction and trust necessary to leap into uncertainty?

Consider the many forms and modes of communication we employ today. What are we co-creating in language?

Our work cultivates a generative mindset to communicate beyond transferring information to creating contexts that move ideas, shape futures, expand perceptions, and open possibilities.

How do we reinvent our meetings as collaborative spaces for learning and co-creating today?

Organizational life today involves interpersonal interactions and mutual understanding to collaborate across multiple platforms. The nature of work, today, requires team learning: to think and learn together in ways that enhance collaboration.

The discipline of team learning confronts our “individualism” to develop and deepen the practice of “dialogue.”

Our work cultivates dialogue and deep listening to support genuine “thinking together,” a free-flowing meaning that allows the group to discover insights not attainable individually.

What does it mean to shamelessly bring learning into every aspect of organizational life?

Our 12 Contemplative Practices support developing the ground of being with conditions and practices which, when embodied, cultivate a learning culture and coaching mindset for conscious leadership.

We research and develop learning and unlearning designs and inquiries with practices that discern the nature and experience of being through an exploration of mind, body, and language.

How is the problem-solving mindset focusing efforts to “push on” symptoms, rather than discovering emergence?

There is no object or problem out there; the causes of our “problems” are part of a single system, beginning with our perceptions, patterns of behavior, structures, and mental models.

Lacking this systemic awareness, we revert to simplistic cause and effect fixes, failing to grasp the source of problems. We are unable to dissolve the frozen thinking of the underlying cause.

Our work explores an integral view of organizational life to develop “design thinking” and “cultural awareness.”

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“Learning organizations are spaces for generative conversations and concerted action. In them, language functions as a device for connection, invention, and coordination.

People can talk from their hearts and connect with one another in the spirit of dialogue. Their dialogue weaves a common fabric and connects them at a deep level of being.

When people talk and listen to each other this way, they create a field of alignment that produces tremendous power to invent new realities in conversation, and to bring about these new realities in action.”

—Peter M. Senge