About Tony Zampella

Tony Zampella serves as the designer of learning programs at Zampella Group. He is an instructor, researcher and developer of learning programs and practices to develop mindsets for creating leadership cultures. His studies include the work of Martin Heidegger and ontological inquiry, Ken Wilber and integral theory, and Zen Buddhism.

Power Dynamics, Part 1: Dimensions and Forms

Power may be one of the universal dimensions of the human experience. Analogous to energy in physics, power in humans can take several forms, such as wealth, armaments, influence, or knowledge.

To do just about anything — collaborate, lead, manage, co-create change, parent, learn, and even teach and coach (yes, teaching and coaching) — requires that we discern our relationship to power, then cultivate how to we wish to use it.

I begin this two-part blog on power by employing two broad definitions:

Power is the capacity to produce intended effects” by Bertrand Russell (1938); and

Power is “the DOWNLOAD PDF

By |2021-06-16T08:24:53-04:00June 14th, 2021|Blog|0 Comments

Three-fold Unlearning to Rethink Leadership Development

Over the years, I’ve experienced two emerging dynamics regarding leadership and employee development: the concern over measuring success and the efficacy of development work. The focus on measuring often prevents the very kind of unlearning required for effective employee development today.

The best development model reveals a three-fold view of new knowledge, new perceptions, and new practices. This view is most effective because it naturally includes unlearning.

The dilemma, however, remains satisfying our preoccupation with return on investment (ROI), which finds it hard to measure unlearning.

The Dilemma of Measuring ROI

The DOWNLOAD PDF

By |2021-06-08T12:54:33-04:00May 24th, 2021|Blog|0 Comments

COVID Lessons: A Return to Rugged Individualism or Not?

Last month marked a year since the arrival of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Reflection on this time surfaces mixed emotions.

There’s a collective restlessness and readiness to move on from this pandemic. Last week, I received emails and texts heralding “Back to Normal” sales, specials, and celebrations. Understandably, many want to get on with life: kids in school, dining at restaurants, theatergoing, shopping, traveling. Just like before.

But something happened this last year—at least for me—and I remain uncertain of the meaning of 2020.

By |2021-04-26T08:34:05-04:00April 26th, 2021|Blog|1 Comment