servant leadership

Becoming the Leader of a Learning Culture, part 2

“Why do we confront learning opportunities with fear rather than wonder?”

“Why do we derive our self‐esteem from knowing as opposed to learning?”

“Why do we criticize others before we even understand them?”

It’s been 25 years since these questions opened the seminal paper Communities of Commitment: The Heart of Learning Organizations by Peter Senge and Fred Kofman.

These questions persist today, as addressed in my last blog. I explored ideas by the authors and developed a framework that identified and examined some of the thinking and areas of focus for developing a learning organization.

In that blog, we discussed five DOWNLOAD PDF

By |2022-07-12T16:54:01-04:00October 2nd, 2018|Blog|0 Comments

The Time is Right for Servant Leadership

I am reposting a revised blog from February 2017, which seems even more relevant today.

A brief examination of headlines in business, government, and education reveals a focus on leadership that seems to intensify with each passing year. Over the last two decades, I’ve reviewed leadership theories, models, and styles, such as situational, functional, adaptive, generative, authentic, collective, collaborative, transformational, and authoritarian, to name a few.

Many of these offer valuable insights for our current Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous (VUCA) times. And it is possible to combine some of these models to develop an effective leadership profile DOWNLOAD PDF

By |2022-07-12T16:39:12-04:00June 4th, 2018|Blog|0 Comments

Skillful Coping: A Test for Servant Leaders

In 1990, John Kotter published his classic paper “What Leaders Really Do” in the Harvard Business Review. Central to the piece he distinguished between managers and leaders, somewhat controversial at the time. Such distinctions were met with skepticism; thought of as useless. Today, we rely on Kotter’s work as an important building block when navigating the leadership terrain:

  • Managers optimize the current paradigm and cope with complexity.
  • Leaders create new paradigms and cope with change.

I recall in 2001 when redesigning the graduate program in Organizational Leadership at Mercy College, DOWNLOAD PDF

By |2022-08-26T17:11:25-04:00September 11th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments
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